amethystsakura


This is my first attempt at blogging. Here I would ramble about things I am currently doing or things that I find interesting. It may be book reviews, recipes, travel information or parenting and health issues. I would also like to upload some of my travel pictures of the various places I have visited in the past. Hope you enjoy reading.

Hummingbirds of the world

http://www.livescience.com/44592-images-beautiful-hummingbirds-of-the-world.html?cmpid=514645_20140407_21486214

ancientpeoples:

Statue of a woman
2000-1750 BC
Old Babylonian
This figure represents a worshipper and must have been originally placed in a temple.
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Statue of a woman

2000-1750 BC

Old Babylonian

This figure represents a worshipper and must have been originally placed in a temple.

(Source: The British Museum)

I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.
Leonardo da Vinci (via psych-facts)
rorschachx:

Primordial gravitational wave discovery heralds ‘whole new era’ in physics
Scientists have heralded a “whole new era” in physics with the detection of “primordial gravitational waves” – the first tremors of the big bang.
The minuscule ripples in space-time are the last prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1916 general theory of relativity to be verified. Until now, there has only been circumstantial evidence of their existence. The discovery also provides a deep connection between general relativity and quantum mechanics, another central pillar of physics.
"This is a genuine breakthrough," says Andrew Pontzen, a cosmologist from University College London who was not involved in the work. "It represents a whole new era in cosmology and physics as well." If the discovery is confirmed, it will almost certainly lead to a Nobel Prize.
The detection, which has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, was announced on Monday at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and comes from the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization 2 (Bicep2) experiment – a telescope at the South Pole.
The detection also provides the first direct evidence for a long-held hypothesis called inflation. This states that a fraction of a second after the big bang, the universe was driven to expand hugely. Without this sudden growth spurt, the gravitational waves would not have been amplified enough to be visible.
"Detecting this signal is one of the most important goals in cosmology today. A lot of work by a lot of people has led up to this point," said John Kovac of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, who leads the BICEP2 collaboration.
The primordial gravitational waves were visible because they created a twisting pattern called polarisation in light from the big bang. Polarisation is the direction in which a light wave oscillates. It is invisible to human eyes, which only register brightness and colour. Sunglasses made from polaroid sheets work by blocking out all light waves except those with a specific polarisation.
Light from the big bang has been turned into microwaves by its passage across space. These microwaves were discovered in 1964 and are known as the cosmic microwave background radiation. Bicep2 was designed to measure their polarisation.
Keep reading

rorschachx:

Primordial gravitational wave discovery heralds ‘whole new era’ in physics

Scientists have heralded a “whole new era” in physics with the detection of “primordial gravitational waves” – the first tremors of the big bang.

The minuscule ripples in space-time are the last prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1916 general theory of relativity to be verified. Until now, there has only been circumstantial evidence of their existence. The discovery also provides a deep connection between general relativity and quantum mechanics, another central pillar of physics.

"This is a genuine breakthrough," says Andrew Pontzen, a cosmologist from University College London who was not involved in the work. "It represents a whole new era in cosmology and physics as well." If the discovery is confirmed, it will almost certainly lead to a Nobel Prize.

The detection, which has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, was announced on Monday at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and comes from the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization 2 (Bicep2) experiment – a telescope at the South Pole.

The detection also provides the first direct evidence for a long-held hypothesis called inflation. This states that a fraction of a second after the big bang, the universe was driven to expand hugely. Without this sudden growth spurt, the gravitational waves would not have been amplified enough to be visible.

"Detecting this signal is one of the most important goals in cosmology today. A lot of work by a lot of people has led up to this point," said John Kovac of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, who leads the BICEP2 collaboration.

The primordial gravitational waves were visible because they created a twisting pattern called polarisation in light from the big bang. Polarisation is the direction in which a light wave oscillates. It is invisible to human eyes, which only register brightness and colour. Sunglasses made from polaroid sheets work by blocking out all light waves except those with a specific polarisation.

Light from the big bang has been turned into microwaves by its passage across space. These microwaves were discovered in 1964 and are known as the cosmic microwave background radiation. Bicep2 was designed to measure their polarisation.

Keep reading

alxndrasplace:

(HubbleSite)  Overlapping Galaxies 2MASX J00482185-2507365
A small, foreground galaxy is silhouetted in front of a larger background galaxy. Dust can be seen extending beyond the small galaxy’s disk of starlight. Such outer dark dusty structures, which appear to be devoid of stars, are rarely so visible in a galaxy because there is usually nothing behind them to illuminate them. Astronomers have never seen dust this far beyond the visible edge of a galaxy. They do not know if these dusty structures are common features in galaxies.
(more…)

alxndrasplace:

(HubbleSite)  Overlapping Galaxies 2MASX J00482185-2507365

A small, foreground galaxy is silhouetted in front of a larger background galaxy. Dust can be seen extending beyond the small galaxy’s disk of starlight. Such outer dark dusty structures, which appear to be devoid of stars, are rarely so visible in a galaxy because there is usually nothing behind them to illuminate them. Astronomers have never seen dust this far beyond the visible edge of a galaxy. They do not know if these dusty structures are common features in galaxies.

(more…)

Source: hubblesite.org

the-absolute-funniest-posts:

malformalady:
Ice separates from a stop sign in Canada


This post has been featured on a 1000Notes.com blog!

the-absolute-funniest-posts:

malformalady:

Ice separates from a stop sign in Canada

This post has been featured on a 1000Notes.com blog!

Source: malformalady

citylandscapes:

Paris, France

citylandscapes:

Paris, France

centuriespast:

Bihar or Bengal, India, or Bangladesh (Indian), Ganesha, Lord of Obstacles , 11th century, gray schist
The Portland Art Museum

centuriespast:

Bihar or Bengal, India, or Bangladesh (Indian), Ganesha, Lord of Obstacles , 11th century, gray schist

The Portland Art Museum

theartofivankatrump:

Arabella’s Apple Pie

theartofivankatrump:

Arabella’s Apple Pie

Tropicana casino and resort in Atlantic City

teachtheyoungtobewise:

yourresidentginger:

devoureth:

Gentlemen and women, take note. [x]

Who needs to take note when apparently there are magical, self-tying bowties.

Muggles.

Source: devoureth

Source: yellowoods

centuriespast:

Inner Coffin of Djed Mut
Egyptian
Date: circa 715-525 B.C.E.
North Carolina Museum of Art

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

hookedonthejollyroger:

griseus:

NEW SPECIE: WALKING SHARK DESCRIBED FROM INDONESIA

A new walking’ bamboo shark, Hemiscyllium halmahera, has been discovered at Weda Resort at Halmahere, Lembeh. is the newest species of elasmobranch to be described.

Aww yiss new species always make me happy!

These fins were made for walking
And that’s just what they’ll do

Source: griseus

kenobi-wan-obi:


The Colliding Spiral Galaxies of Arp 271

What will become of these galaxies?
Spiral galaxies NGC 5426 and NGC 5427 are passing dangerously close to each other, but each is likely to survive this collision. Typically when galaxies collide, a large galaxy eats a much smaller galaxy. In this case, however, the two galaxies are quite similar, each being a sprawling spiral with expansive arms and a compact core.
As the galaxies advance over the next tens of millions of years, their component stars are unlikely to collide, although new stars will form in the bunching of gas caused by gravitational tides. Close inspection of the above image taken by the 8-meter Gemini-South Telescope in Chile shows a bridge of material momentarily connecting the two giants.
Known collectively as Arp 271, the interacting pair spans about 130,000 light years and lies about 90 million light-years away toward the constellation of Virgo. Recent predictions hold that our Milky Way Galaxy will undergo a similar collision with the neighboring Andromeda Galaxy in a few billion years.

kenobi-wan-obi:

The Colliding Spiral Galaxies of Arp 271

What will become of these galaxies?

Spiral galaxies NGC 5426 and NGC 5427 are passing dangerously close to each other, but each is likely to survive this collision. Typically when galaxies collide, a large galaxy eats a much smaller galaxy. In this case, however, the two galaxies are quite similar, each being a sprawling spiral with expansive arms and a compact core.

As the galaxies advance over the next tens of millions of years, their component stars are unlikely to collide, although new stars will form in the bunching of gas caused by gravitational tides. Close inspection of the above image taken by the 8-meter Gemini-South Telescope in Chile shows a bridge of material momentarily connecting the two giants.

Known collectively as Arp 271, the interacting pair spans about 130,000 light years and lies about 90 million light-years away toward the constellation of Virgo. Recent predictions hold that our Milky Way Galaxy will undergo a similar collision with the neighboring Andromeda Galaxy in a few billion years.

Source: kenobi-wan-obi